Last edited by Moogukasa
Friday, May 8, 2020 | History

10 edition of Xuanzang found in the catalog.

Xuanzang

a Buddhist pilgrim on the Silk Road

by Sally Hovey Wriggins

  • 328 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Westview Press in Boulder, Colo .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China
    • Subjects:
    • Xuanzang, ca. 596-664,
    • Priests, Buddhist -- China -- Biography

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-256) and index.

      StatementSally Hovey Wriggins ; with a foreword by Frederick W. Mote.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsBQ8149.H787 W75 1996
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxiv, 263 p., [4] p. of col. plates :
      Number of Pages263
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL809874M
      ISBN 100813328012
      LC Control Number95046702

      The Silk Road journey with Xuanzang. [Sally Hovey Wriggins] -- Walk the Silk Road with the Buddhist monk who crisscrossed the Asian continent and prompted a great cultural exchange between India and China. # ACLS Humanities E-Book (Series)\/span>\n \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema.   From One Piece to Dragon Ball Z, the most famous names in anime can trace their roots to the journey of Xuanzang to India in the seventh century A.D. Travelling in the footsteps of Fa-Hien, Xuanzang sought the truth about Buddhism and decided to find it in the land of its : Madras Courier.

      Study on Xuanzang's Translation of Heart Sutra (also known as the simple book and the unabridged Xuanzang (), a famous monk in the Tang Dynasty, is commonly known as the " Sanzang Rabbi." He chose to be nun at the age of thirteen and received full ordination at the age of.   Pilgrim to the West in the Tang Dynasty: a book Xuanzang and Bian Ji compiled. It recorded geography, people, customs, history, religions, languages and cultures of about countries, which provided precious data for studying history and geography. It is another big travelogue after Records of the Buddhist Kingdoms written by Fa Xi'an, a.

      Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Author of Da Tang Xiyu ji, Ch'eng wei-shih lun, Si-yu-ki, Dai-Tō Saiikiki, Si-yu-ki. Buddhist records of the Western World, Mémoires sur les contrées . Xuanzang: A Buddhist Pilgrim on the Silk Road Sallly Hovey Wriggins, Author, Sally Hovey Wriggins, Author, Frederick W. Mote, Introduction by Westview Press $49 (p) ISBN Buy.


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Xuanzang by Sally Hovey Wriggins Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book contains minor errors, could have been more critical and Xuanzang's feet on the cover need alteration. Leaving this aside, there is a stunning picture from Bamiyan and we can see what was lost as well as related paintings and statues which are quite exquisite (at least one of them lost from the Kabul museum since the destructive Cited by: Xuanzang (Chinese: 玄奘; WadeGiles: Hsüan-tsang; c.

), born Chen Hui or Chen Yi (Chen I), was a Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller, and translator who described the interaction between China and India in the early Tang in what is now Henan province aroundfrom boyhood he took to reading religious books, including the Chinese classics and the writings of /5.

The Silk Road Journey with Xuanzang tells the saga of the seventh-century Chinese monk Xuanzang, one of China's great heroes, who completed an epic sixteen-year-long journey to discover the heart of Buddhism at its source in India.

Eight centuries before Columbus, this intrepid pilgrim trave miles on the Silk Road, meeting most of Asia's important leaders at that/5.

Xuanzang wrote some eyewitness accounts of these gigantic statues Xuanzang book AD, and this book is an important starting point to finding out more about these monuments and what they originally looked like/5(8). Xuanzang's Record of the Western Regions (BOOK ONE) composed by the Buddhist pilgrim in at the request of the Tang Emperor translated by Samuel Beal () Xuanzang was a Chinese Buddhist monk and translator who traveled across the Tarim basin via the northern route, Turfan, Kucha, Tashkent, Samarkand, Bactria, then over the Hindu Kush to India.

Xuanzang spent the remainder of his life translating the Buddhist scriptures, numbering items packed in cases, that he brought back from India. He was able to translate only a small portion of this huge volume, about 75 items in 1, chapters, but his translations included some of the most important Mahayana scriptures.

Xuanzang’s main interest centred on the philosophy of the. This book is the history of the early life of Hiuen Tsiang (Xuanzang) and his travels in India. Xuanzang ( -- ) was a Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller, and translator who travelled to India in the seventh century and described the interaction between Chinese Buddhism and Indian Buddhism during the early Tang Rating: % positive.

The book received excellent reviews but a few flaws were picked up. Wriggins has corrected most of these drawbacks in this edition that has slightly changed name: "The Silk Road Journey with Xuanzang" pointing the index more on the travel route than on the character/5(2).

Xuanzang's contribution to Chinese Buddhism/Malati J. Shendge. Xuanzang's Stay at Nalanda as depicted in the Scroll on the Tripitaka Master Xuanzang /Ineke Van Put. Note on contributors. China as we know is a great civilization and Xuanzang's (who is popularly known as Hsuan tsang) visit to.

The saga of the seventh-century Chinese monk Xuanzang, who completed an epic sixteen-year journey to discover the heart of Buddhism at its source in India, is a splendid story of human struggle and triumph.

One of China's great heroes, Xuanzang is introduced here for the first time to Western readers in this richly illustrated Hovey Wriggins, who journeyed in Xuanzang's footsteps. Xuanzang (fictional character): | | | Xuanzang | | | | || World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most.

Recently I found a book on the travels and life of Master XuanZang. When I found that it was freely available due to it's age, I thought I would share it more widely. Hope you enjoy reading it. Xuanzang (or Hsüan-tsang in Wade-Giles) was born with the secular name Ch’en Yi; he is also known by the honorific names Tripitaka and T’ang San-tsang.

He was descended from a prominent Honan. The Silk Road Journey with Xuanzang tells the saga of the seventh-century Chinese monk Xuanzang, one of China's great heroes, who completed an epic sixteen-year-long journey to discover the heart of Buddhism at its source in India.

Eight centuries before Columbus, this intrepid pilgrim trave miles on the Silk Road, meeting most of Asia's important leaders at that s: 1. Xuanzang's legacy. Of all the works translated by Xuanzang, the one that has remained the most popular, and which has been chanted daily throughout East Asia for over a thousand years, is the Heart Sutra.

Famous for its line, "form is emptiness, emptiness is form," it was also what Xuanzang himself chanted at the moment of his death. The Travel Records of Chinese Pilgrims Faxian, Xuanzang, and Yijing SOURCES FOR CROSS-C ULTURAL ENCOUNTERS BETWEEN ANCIENT CHINA AND ANCIENT INDIA By Tansen Sen The statue of Xuanzang at the Great Wild Goose Pagoda in Xi'an, which was built to house the texts he brought back from Size: 1MB.

By all means read this book if you are interested in the history of the Silk Road. However there is a significant omission in this book. Xuanzang embarked on this epic journey because he wanted to learn Buddhism from the original source. But if you think you'll be able to learn much about 7th century Buddhism from this book, think again/5(6).

Xuanzang arrived back in China with Buddhist relics, six statues and more than religious texts after a journey of 40, miles. The Emperor ordered him to write about his experiences. He had completed this book, Ta-T'ang Si-Yu-Ki (Memoirs on Western Countries) by the time he died in Occupation: Scholar, traveller, and translator.

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The story of the seventh-century Chinese Buddhist monk Xuanzang (in older writings spelled Hsuan-tsang, Yuan Chwang, Hiuen Tsiang, and other ways), who made a sixteen-year pilgrimage to the India of the great King Harsha in order to learn about Buddhist teachings at the source, is one of the great sagas in human history.

Get this from a library! The Silk Road journey with Xuanzang. [Sally Hovey Wriggins] -- "The Silk Road Journey with Xuanzang tells the saga of the seventh-century Chinese monk Xuanzang, one of China's great heroes, who completed an epic sixteen-year-long journey to discover the heart of.

The Silk Road Journey with Xuanzang tells the saga of the seventh-century Chinese monk Xuanzang, one of China's great heroes, who completed an epic sixteen-year-long journey to discover the heart of Buddhism at its source in India.

Eight centuries before Columbus, this intrepid pilgrim trave miles on the Silk Road, meeting most of Asia's important leaders at that : Basic Books.The book contains minor errors, could have been more critical and Xuanzang's feet on the cover need alteration.

Leaving this aside, there is a stunning picture from Bamiyan and we can see what was lost as well as related paintings and statues which are quite exquisite (at least one of them lost from the Kabul museum since the destructive /5(8).