Last edited by Taubar
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

7 edition of The Holy Wells of Ireland found in the catalog.

The Holy Wells of Ireland

by Patrick Logan

  • 343 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by Colin Smythe .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Local history,
  • Religion,
  • History - General History,
  • Ireland,
  • Philosophy,
  • Europe - Ireland,
  • Folklore & Mythology,
  • Holidays - Christian

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsJim O"Callahgan (Illustrator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages176
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8307990M
    ISBN 100861400461
    ISBN 109780861400461
    OCLC/WorldCa7975246

    Ireland’s Holy Wells County-by-County is a very exciting project set up and run by Dr. Celeste Ray Professor of Anthropology at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Celeste has been carrying out research on Irish holy wells since and has spent a lot of time researching Ireland wells. For Christmas Gary Branigan’s excellent and invaluable Ancient and Holy wells of Dublin arrived and a great book it is to. A real detailed field guide revealing how many fascinating sites there are in the Dublin area, and hopefully this will be the spearhead for similar studies in all the Republic’s counties.

    The Holy Wells and Healing Springs of Derbyshire: A Gazetteer and Field Guide to Holy Wells, Mineral Springs, Spas and Folklore Water (In Search of England’s Holy Wells) by R. B. Parish () The fourth of my volumes and obviously the most useful book on the subject in the county. Ireland’s Holy Wells County-by-County is a very exciting project set up and run by Dr. Celeste Ray Professor of Anthropology at the University of the South in Sewanee, Tennessee. Celeste has been carrying out research on Irish holy wells since and has spent a lot of time researching Ireland wells. The project came about.

    Facebook is showing information to help you better understand the purpose of a Page. See actions taken by the people who manage and post ers: K. When used at the clootie wells in Scotland, Ireland, and the Isle of Man, the pieces of cloth are generally dipped in the water of the holy well and then tied to a branch while a prayer of supplication is said to the spirit of the well – in modern times usually a saint, but in pre-Christian times a goddess or local nature spirit. This is most often done by those seeking healing, though some.


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The Holy Wells of Ireland by Patrick Logan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Product details Paperback: pages Publisher: Colin Smythe Ltd (Febru ) Language: English ISBN ISBN Product Dimensions: x x inches Shipping Weight: ounces (View shipping rates and policies) Customer Reviews: out Cited by:   Holy wells have been a feature of the religion of the Irish people for longer than records have existed, and while pilgrimages to them are not as common as in the last centuries, many wells are still visited, particularly on the Saints' or 'Pattern' Days, and even now new wells occasionally appear.4/5.

This book re-assesses archaeological research into holy well sites in Ireland and the evidence for votive deposition at watery sites throughout northwest European prehistory. Ray examines a much-ignored and diminishing archaeological resource; moving beyond debates about the possible Celticity of these sites in order to gain a deeper understanding of patterns among sacred watery by: 2.

Among the many books available on Irish holy wells, this is the most scholarly and well-researched.

The authors document many holy wells, both renowned and obscure, but more importantly, this book is more than a simple guidebook but offers a profound analysis of the ways in which places are connected, through culture, to human by: This book captures the unique spirit of fifty wells (of the visited by the authors) through stunning photography and illuminating text, exploring the individuality of each well, their many forms and setting, and the assorted personal offerings that decorate them/5(3).

x pp. pbk repr. of edition Holy wells have been a feature of the religion of the Irish people for longer than records have existed, and while pilgrimages to them are not as common as in the last centuries, many wells are still visited, particularly on the Saints’ or ‘Pattern’ Days, and even now new wells occasionally appear.

The book begins by exploring the origins and antiquity of holy wells. The author then discusses the Clare group of wells against the social and historical landscape of the county during 19th century, charting the rise and fall of the popularity of devotion at wells, their significance to the community and the slow decline to modern times.

Locations of Holy Wells in Ireland. Patrick Logan, in his book "The Holy Wells of Ireland", cites a claim that there are approximately 3, Holy Wells in Ireland. He claims that almost every parish in the country has at least one holy well.

Some holy wells may not be well known as they have fallen into disrepair or may not be visited any more. And in Ireland, where the thinly-disguised pagan ceremony of ‘paying Rounds’ is still practised at holy wells, we hear of the the well of St. Monachan in Kerry, about which was said there was ‘not a better well in Munster to give Rounds at; sure there is a salmon and an eel in it, and whoever has the luck to get a look at them may be sure.

The popularity of visiting Holy Wells remained constant over the centuries, but particularly during the reign of Henry VIII in the 16 th century. Popularity was also high during the enforcement of the Penal Laws in the 18 th Century.

During these periods in particular, religious houses were closed and persecuted peoples were forced to visit alternative places of worship where fear of. The veracious Gerald de Barri records some marvellous stories of the famous Irish wells of his own time; and any modern tourist can easily find out many holy wells, to which the people pay great veneration, and which they are wont to visit for the performance of certain religious “rounds” or exercises on the feast days of the “patrons” of these holy wells.

The Holy Wells of Ireland | start of essay The Holy Well of Ballintober, in the Co. Mayo, has been famous through many centuries. Both town and parish took their name from the well, which became in after ages so celebrated that a great abbey of Canons Regular was founded there in the thirteenth century.

There are said to be around 3, holy wells in Ireland, including natural springs, elaborate stone monuments, sea caves and hidden sites in tunnels under some city and town streets. A holy well is a location where water issues from the earth and where the site is a focal point for supernatural divination.

The Book of Kells is an illuminated manuscript Gospel book in Latin, containing the four Gospels of the New Testament together with various prefatory texts and tables.

It was created in a Columban monastery in either Britain or Ireland and may have had contributions from various Columban institutions from both Britain and Ireland. It is believed to have been created c. The text of the Gospels is largely. After St. Patrick, the greatest missionary saints of Ireland were Brigid and Columcille.

Brigid, “the Mary of the Gael,” was a woman, not only of great holiness, but also of great zeal and energy in doing the work of made missionary journeys throughout various parts of Ireland. She founded many churches, and nigh to her churches we find the holy wells that still bear her name.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Logan, Patrick. Holy wells of Ireland. Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire: Smythe, (OCoLC)   Holy wells have been a feature of the religion of the Irish people for longer than records have existed, and while pilgrimages to them are not as common as in the last centuries, many wells are still visited, particularly on the Saints’ or ‘Pattern’ Days, and even now new wells occasionally : Buy The Holy Wells of Ireland by Patrick Logan (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(2). Holy Wells of Cork and Kerry. likes. looks at many of the holy wells visited in early and later medieval Ireland such at St Molings Holy Well, St Mullens Co Carlow and the holy wells of Struell.

See More. Columba Books. April 24 at AM NEW BOOK ALERT. Our latest book 'Journeys of Faith: Stories of Pilgrimage from Medieval Followers: The Holy Wells Of Ireland Top results of your surfing The Holy Wells Of Ireland Start Download Portable Document Format (PDF) and E-books (Electronic Books) Free Online Rating News / is books that can provide inspiration, insight, knowledge to the reader.

This is really a lovely book and perfect for dipping in and out of. If anyone is keen to find out more about the holy wells of Meath, the book Meath Holy Wells – PRICE €15, is available at Maguires, Hill of Tara, Newgrange, Antonia’s, Trim, Siopa an Caislean, Trim and Post Office, Trim.

Also by post from Noel French, Castle Street, Trim for €15 including postage.27 With sacred springs, without holy wells: the case of Estonia. Heiki Valk. 28 The holy wells of Wychwood Forest, England.

Martin Haigh. 29 Holy wells and trees in Poland as an element of local and national identity. Wojciech Bedyński. 30 Visiting holy wells in seventeenth-century Sweden: the case of St. Ingemo’s Well in Dala. Terese. Holy wells in Ireland are often credited with a cure and, traveling around the country, you will find the cure to most ailments hidden away in a local well.

Popular cures involve using the water Author: Susan Byron.